History of abandoned malls in the US

How Many Abandoned Malls In The US?

How Many Abandoned Malls In The US?

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How many abandoned malls are in the US?

How many abandoned malls are in the US? There are many abandoned malls in the US.  In recent years, with the increasing advancement of technology, face-to-face shopping is no longer booming. This has caused many people to make their purchases online and as a result, many shopping malls are empty. This is the main reason for the abandonment of shopping malls in the United States.

 

How many abandoned malls are in the US? There are many abandoned malls in the US. Although officials in many parts of the world are eliminating old markets in cities, some architects are turning these spaces into spaces for various purposes, such as sidewalks.

Traditional retailers have seen their sales decline since customers increased their online shopping, which is bad news for stores. Several new stores have been built in the last decade, and a huge stock is witnessing a declining growth rate.

There are many shopping malls in the United States that are now abandoned. Here’s how to put one together for use with your favorite 20-year-old shopping malls in the United States.

 

How many abandoned malls are in the US?
How many abandoned malls are in the US?

 

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History of abandoned malls in the US

Throughout history, the retail industry has undergone many changes and has taken on its present form. Researchers predict that more than 300 stores in the United States will be completely closed within the next five years if store closures continue around the world, but the good news is that many architects are using these abandoned malls in the US for a variety of uses. And they give it far more vitality than ever before.

Since 1956, about 1,500 large indoor markets have been built in the United States, of which 1,000 passages continue to serve their original purpose, while another 500 shopping malls have lost their original use and New targets have been used.

Many of these places are now used as sports centers, industrial zones, information centers, distribution centers, and even housing, while others are abandoned malls in the US and unused.

 

History of abandoned malls in the US
History of abandoned malls in the US

 

The fate of shopping malls today is very different from what happened to such places in the 1980s; At that time, many passages throughout the United States were turned into unused subways for decades, and these days, urban planners are using these locations for a variety of purposes.

Owners and officials are trying to change the use of these spaces more smartly than before and create positive changes in them.

 

What is the reason for the abandonment of shopping malls in the United States?

Many critics believe that one of the major benefits of old shopping malls in the communities that have grown around them. There are many abandoned malls in the US.

The need of these communities does not end with shopping and entertainment in these centers, but also includes medical services, jobs, education, and physical activities.

Older large indoor markets, on the other hand, often cover more than 150,000 square meters, allowing designers and architects to set big goals for changing their use.

In the past, these places were designed only as shopping centers and focused on car traffic, but today, many of them are closed to motor vehicles and have a multi-purpose application. Perhaps the question that comes to mind here is why the role of old shopping malls has diminished in the last two decades?

 

What is the reason for the abandonment of shopping malls in the United States?
What is the reason for the abandonment of shopping malls in the United States?

 

Indoor markets are trade market giants whose success depends on each of their sales and advertising booths. Annual sales in major US markets fell by 20% from 2017 to 2018, which researchers predict will continue this downward trend.

In 2018, more than 270 chain stores of Sears retail closed in the United States, and hundreds of Macy’s chain stores closed under a series of contracts from 2015 onwards. Many of these markets have major stores that increase the likelihood of selling products from nearby stores.

Indoor markets that do not have the main store are wasting their time and raising a lot of debt over time, which in turn leads to the closure of many shopping malls. On the other hand, e-commerce has significantly reduced the prosperity of large markets and led to the closure of many of these centers.

The use of large indoor markets has changed these days; Some of these sites will be completely demolished and replaced by new structures. Some retain their appearance but have different uses.

A branch of Sears chain stores in Littleton, Colorado, has stopped selling products that owners want to convert into apartments and offices, and ground floors of new structures into shopping malls or malls.

One of the largest markets in California, located in the city of San Bernardino, with an area of ​​more than 160,000 square meters, was completely closed in 2017, and since then, many architects have presented their plans for the redevelopment of space to the authorities.

 

Abandoned malls in the US
Abandoned malls in the US

 

Abandoned malls in the US

  • Las Vegas: Many of the central lanes of Las Vegas and Nevada closed after the 2008 financial crisis.
  • Phoenix Village: Phoenix Village, closed in Fort Smith, Arkansas during the 1990s.
  • Parkway Central Store: Parkway Central Store in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania closed in 2013 after the loss of Kmart. This was the last ship anchor shop.
  • Mountain Farms Market: The Farm Farms Market in Hadley, Massachusetts was partially closed in 2000.
  • Mayfield Market: Mayfield Market in Mountain View, California was closed in 1983 due to competition with other local central stores.
  • Lexington Market: The Lexington Market in Lexington, Kentucky, declined in the 1990s and was finally shut down in 2005.
  • Woodville Market: Woodville Market in Northwood, Ohio closed in 2011 and was demolished in March 2014.
  • Randall Park Market: Randall Park Market in North Randall, Ohio closed in March 2009.
  • Woodville Store: The Woodville store in Northwood, Ohio closed completely in 2008.
  • Westland Market: The Westland Market in Columbus, Ohio was closed to traffic in 2012.
  • The White Lake Shopping Mall in Topeka, Kansas closed in the early 2000s.
  • Ashtabula Towne Market Square: Ashtabula Towne Market Square in Ashtabula, Ohio was closed in 2011.
  • Rolling Acres: The Iker Rolling Market in Akron, Ohio closed in 2008.
  • Canton Central Market: Canton Central Market in Canton, Ohio closed in the early 2000s.
  • Mobile Market (Mellett): Mobile Market in Canton, Ohio closed in the early 2000s.
  • Hawthorne Plaza: Hawthorne Plaza in Hawthorne, California was partially closed in the 1990s. This possibility of closing it has been used in a number of Hollywood movies.
  • Six Flags Market: Six Flags Market was largely abandoned in Arlington, Texas in 2012.
  • Cloverleaf Leaf Market: The cloverleaf market in Chesterfield, Virginia closed in 2003 after the loss of GC Penny and moviegoers over the years.

 

Inside America’s eerie abandoned malls

Inside America’s eerie abandoned malls

 

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4 Comments

  1. multi-purpose application. Perhaps the question that comes to mind here is why the role of old shopping malls has diminished in the last two decades?

  2. Hawthorne Plaza: Hawthorne Plaza in Hawthorne, California was partially closed in the 1990s. This possibility of closing it has been used in a number of Hollywood movies.

  3. multi-purpose application. Perhaps the question that comes to mind here is why the role of old shopping malls has diminished in the last two decades?

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